We’re Baaaack!

DolphinsWe broke off our operations around midnight and headed to port.  We made all our preparations to enter port, and arrived at the channel entrance around 7:30 am.  It was an early start, but nobody seemed to mind, since it meant we were almost home!

The dolphins found us again, along with lots of other creatures.  We encountered numerous large jellyfish, lots of pelicans, and even a little crab swimming at the surface of the water.

Next thing we knew, we were at the pier and the mooring lines were going over.  Now began the work of offloading the samples to be shipped to the lab, along with lots of gear, belonging to both the scientists and the ship.

Although it’s great to be back on land, the NOAA crew and the scientists from Texas A&M University and the University of California at Santa Barbara are thankful for the opportunity to sail on this expedition.  We worked hard, but we had a great crew and had a wonderful experience.

Attaching Mooring Lines

Attaching Mooring Lines

We hope you enjoyed reading our mission log as much as we enjoyed writing it.  Stay tuned for future missions, onboard the Pisces as well as the other ships from the federal response that will be searching for subsurface oil.

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3 Responses to We’re Baaaack!

  1. I’ve only seen wild dolphins once–when I was on a ferry in the Philippines, a pod of dolphins suddenly appeared and decided to play with the ferry, swimming and jumping in front of the bow for a minute or two, then just as suddenly breaking off and swimming away–but it’s something I’ll never forget. I’m happy to know there are people like you working to study and preserve the marine environment.

  2. In the Philippines, over thirty species of whales and dolphins can be observed around Central Visayas, Davao Gulf, the northern coast of the province-island Palawan, and in Batanes. The Visayas is particularly known area for dolphin sightings, and is home to one of the larger populations of the Fraser’s Dolphin in the world. Dolphin species in the Visayas are attracted to fish lures and to commercial fishing operations. In the northermost province of Batanes, at least 12 species of whales and dolphins has been sighted, making it the single location in the country with the highest cetacean diversity. There seems to be no specific whale watching season in the Philippines, although the calmer waters of the summer season typically provides the best conditions. Some populations, like those of the Humpback Whales in Batanes, appear migratory. Other populations have yet to be studied. Some former coastal whaling communities in the Philippines have also started to generate whale watching income.

  3. delorislara says:

    dolphins are really cute and also intelligent. i love it when they do some tricks.

    Deloris K. Lara
    Relay technician
    http://www.cheapswimsuitsforwomen.net

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